Ireland's Sustainable Energy Supply Chain Opportunity

Abstract:

A coordinated approach to supporting sustainable energy supply chains will promote economic growth and create thousands of jobs in Ireland. 

Publication Date: 2014

Organisation: Sustainable Energy Authority Ireland

Author: Sustainable Energy Authority Ireland

Irish Ports Offshore Renewable Energy Services (IPORES): A Review of Irish Ports Offshore Capability in Relation to Requirements for the Marine Renewable Energy Industry

Abstract:

Irish Ports Offshore Renewable Energy Services (IPORES): A Review of Irish Ports Offshore Capability in Relation to Requirements for the Marine Renewable Energy Industry. 

Publication Date: 2012

Organisation: Irish Maritime Development Office

Author: Irish Maritime Development Office

Offshore Renewable Energy Development Plan Strategic Environmental Assessment Main Report

Abstract:

Offshore Renewable Energy Development Plan Strategic Environmental Assessment Main Report

Publication Date: 2014

Organisation: Department of Communications, Energy and Natural Resources

Author: SEAI, CMRC, Metoc

A Hydrodynamic Modelling Framework for Strangford Lough Part 1: Tidal Model

Abstract:

Hydrodynamic models are a powerful tool that can be used by a wide range of end users to assist in predicting the effects of both physical and biological processes on local environmental conditions. This paper describes the development of a tidal model for Strangford Lough, Northern Ireland, a body of water renowned for the location of the first grid-connected tidal turbine, SeaGen, as well as the UK’s third Marine Nature Reserve. Using MIKE 21 modelling software, the development, calibration and performance of the model are described in detail. Strangford Lough has a complex flow pattern with high flows through the Narrows (~3.5 m/s) linking the main body of the Lough to the Irish Sea and intricate flow patterns around the numerous islands. With the aid of good quality tidal and current data obtained throughout the Lough during the model development, the surface elevation and current magnitude between the observed and numerical model were almost identical with model skill >0.98 and >0.84 respectively. The applicability of the model is such that it can be used as an important tool for the prediction of important ecological processes as well as engineering applications within Strangford Lough. 

Publication Date: 2014

Organisation: Queens University Belfast

Author: Dr Bjoern Elsaesser

Wave and Tidal Energy Market Deployment Strategy in Europe

Abstract:

Despite an investment crisis brought on by the biggest economic recession Europe has seen since the Second World War, the EU is on track to fulfil its ambitious 2020 renewable energy targets. In 2012, Europe’s renewable energy industry employed 1.2 million people and generated €130 billion of economic activity1, the vast majority of which did not exist just one decade ago. The reasons for this are straightforward. Targets at the EU level have provided long-term regulatory stability, matched with EU funding, which reduces risk by advancing technologies along readiness levels. Nationallevel targets in every Member State have resulted in governments putting in place capital and revenue support mechanisms, creating a vibrant market for renewable energy and generating volume production which has driven  remarkable cost reduction across the most mature renewable energy technologies. Although it has now taken the first generation of renewable energy technologies to competitive levels, Europe still needs to diversify its electricity supply further if it is to meet its 2050 policy objective of reducing greenhouse gas emissions to 80 – 95% below 1990 levels2. Increased energy generation from renewable sources has been identified by the European Commission as a ‘no-regrets option’ for meeting these objectives3. Wave and tidal energy are the next generation of renewable energy technologies, and they will be needed if Europe is to meet its decarbonisation targets. These technologies can also support better grid integration for all renewables. Wave and tidal projects can, for example, be developed in areas of low solar or wind resource. Electricity generation from wave and tidal is also out of sync with other renewable technologies, and will provide further balancing effects for European transmission systems. However, binding renewable energy targets for the post-2020 period are necessary in order to provide clarity for investors. In a tough economic climate, and without binding targets, the incentive to shift from the status quo will be significantly weakened. Wave and tidal energy technologies must now find a route to market in more uncertain times than their predecessors.

Publication Date: June 2014

Organisation: Ocean Energy Europe

Author: Ocean Energy Europe

Strangford Lough and the SeaGen Tidal Turbine

Abstract:

The background to and outcomes of the Environmental Monitoring Programme (EMP) required by statutory regulators for the deployment of the SeaGen tidal turbine in Strangford Lough, Northern Ireland, an area with many conservation designations, are described. The EMP, which was set within the context of an adaptive management approach, considered possible effects of the device on local populations of seals and harbour porpoises, representative seabirds and benthic communities. The studies on seals were carried out on both local and regional scales. The ecological studies were complemented by detailed field and hydrodynamic modelling investigations together with a programme of mitigation measures designed to reduce collisions between seals and turbine rotors. In general only minor statistically significant changes in abundance, distribution and animal behaviour patterns were recorded, principally associated with small distributional shifts close to the turbine structure and with the likelihood that these changes were ecologically of little significance. The seal–rotor collision mitigation studies provided a base for the establishment of acceptable collision risk strategies. The EMP highlighted observational, methodological and statistical challenges in assessing the environmental consequences of marine energy devices. A brief review of related studies in Strangford Lough is included.

Publication Date: 2014

Organisation: Queens University Belfast

Author: Dr Bjoern Elsaesser

Offshore Renewable Energy Development Plan Strategic Environmental Assessment Main Report Addendum

Abstract:

Offshore Renewable Energy Development Plan Strategic Environmental Assessment Main Report Addendum.

Publication Date: 2014

Organisation: Department of Communications, Energy and Natural Resources

Author: SEAI, CMRC, Metoc

Ireland Transmission System 2013

Abstract:

EirGrid SONI all-island transmission system for 400, 275, 220 and 110 KV electricity infrastructure.

Publication Date: 2013

Organisation: EirGrid

Author: EirGrid

Non-technical barriers to wave energy in Europe

Abstract:

This document describes the non-technical barriers which the wave energy industry will encounter after the prototype research and development phase is complete.

Publication Date: 2009

Organisation: HMRC

Author: HMRC

The Supply Chain for the Ocean Energy Industry in Ireland

Abstract:

Ireland has an unprecedented opportunity to build a position of strength as a supply chain to the world- wide ocean energy industry. The policy landscape – including required legislation and provision of a policy framework for ocean energy- is moving in a positive direction but a greater sense of urgency is required. Most importantly, Government is negotiating an export framework with the United Kingdom which could provide a market for all forms of Irish marine energy and exploit our formidable offshore energy natural resource with potentially significant new job creation.

The development of an export market with the UK would provide a market for Irish ocean energy, but enabling actions are still required. Firms in the supply chain are aware of the ocean energy opportunity but need the confidence which would be provided by more overt Government leadership of the sector and, most important, the development of real business opportunities.

In particular, the Irish Government needs to give the private sector the confidence to invest in ocean energy and enable business interests to build a base to serve world-wide markets for ocean energy equipment and services. This can be achieved through the provision of a: 

An allocation of ocean energy Renewable Energy Feed-In Tariff (REFIT) to incentivise early investment

Clear consenting process administered by a single body (An Bord Pleanála) offering developers – whether of demonstration arrays or, later, of export oriented ocean energy farms - a clear route to a fully consented site...with a proactive landlord in the form of the Department of Environment, Community and Local Government

  • Capital grants regime which addresses the needs of device developers for substantial support at this critical emergent stage of ocean energy technology 
  • Clear route to grid access for demonstration arrays and, in time, ocean energy based electricity exporters.
  • A strong Ocean Renewable Energy Development Plan backed up by an implementation group with industry involvement 

The absence of any of the elements would be a severe impediment to the growth of ocean energy in Ireland.

Publication Date: 2013

Organisation: MRIA

Author: MRIA

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